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CSPAN
Feb 20, 2013 11:00pm EST
and russia, among other things, acted as a mediator between those two factions. >> i'm sorry. and did not get the last of sentence. >> that russia, one of russia's rolls was sort of to mediate between two factions. i got the sense that priscilla buckley and burnham were sort of distant ancestors of neo conservatives and meyer, of course, being a fusion test some -- the fusion test would have disagreements. was primarily about what conservative should do about the welfare state. um wondering what russia's role was in as ideological debates. >> a very good question. i would commend something he says which is, i don't believe there was much conflict about what position to take on the welfare state, but there was some. it was not russia's primary concern. his primary concern in terms of radiology was that national review must be in the logical, that the exact positions it took would very often be secondary, but that insofar as it had certain believe some these issues, in the issues, it should be really serious about holding other conservatives and especially public office holders to a
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2013 10:30am EST
, in talking about another country, russia. you know, russia desperately wants to reproduce itself to the rest of the world. and not in some of the main it has been. they get this opportunity with the g20 coming up in september. crystal ball, do you see anything from a coordination standpoint from the g20, and -- having out of this? this? and easy russia's image change? >> i think this is a big opportunity for the prime minister to show what could happen in russia. we will just have to see. because they're sitting on all these oil reserves. we know where the price of oil is. but there as you know there's a lot of problems. and so we have to see whether communist, russia can show that it's taking some of these reforms it needs to take. and we will see. and this is a perfect opportunity to do so. so far i think, as i said, the only g20 meeting that really did any thing positive was the one in london. and i give credit to gordon brown. that was his greatest moment i think at that particular time. do it. no, i mean come effect very organized meetings. i was in korea. there was no one who
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2013 6:00pm EST
soviet union, how do you see russia developing over the next few years and do you think that their importance in the world will continue to increase perhaps even suppressing china? i think the russians are in trouble in terms of the global standing and i think they know it. the russian economy is 80% on the oil gas and minerals that isn't a modern economy and i will tell you a little story that shows how much the oil and gas and minerals are linked up with personal fortunes, political power and the state. i was at the australian foreign minister's house one day having a meeting about energy policy and he was going around asking people about the energy policy, and so the russians as well, you know, we understand that our oil and gas fields are technologically behind. but no foreigner will ever known russian olive oil and gas so we are going to buy the technology for the western oil companies. so i had been a director of the corporation and i said so don't you understand that there's advantages in their technology they aren't coming to sell you their technology to make you a better c
CSPAN
Feb 10, 2013 11:00pm EST
factor or not and bring more members to draw closer to russia and even bring in as george bush did the former hud republics of the soviet union into this alliance and you wonder why the russians are upset about this and he lost his nerve on the things the country needed to do in terms of international agreements need to be a part of the accord and signed a comprehensive test ban treaty needed to be a part of the mines and the ban on the cluster bombs. we should have been a part of banning the use of teenagers in combat. over 100 nations have signed all of these pacts and if you look at the country that didn't, what we call the road nations in the united states saw them get to george bush and it's painful to talk about those eight years the fact that country reelected george bush doesn't say very much for any of us anywhere you boies edmondson use of intelligence on the war to a certain degree we certainly had it in the mexican war and the 1840's and the spanish-american war act. but in vietnam, the resolution was based on the misuse of intelligence. but you never had the systematic des
CSPAN
Feb 21, 2013 5:00pm EST
to european security and embolden russia, who would seek to make use of that. if there were any such weakening of resolve, it would create instability, perhaps a crisis of confidence in europe, and potentially lead to more nuclear percolation. i outlined this in his first introductory. just to highlight whether this is true. there are questions in here. secondly, there is a question about whether deterrence are different in any way compare to those over here. and doesn't matter. there is also a question about what is driving this. are there increasing divisions between european and their attitudes towards russia? those are my questions. it is the american information security council, and we engage in discussions like this around nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation. but i'm going to introduce to you first dub brown, more formally lord browne, who is the secretary of defense around 2006 until 2009. he is also part of the european leadership network. we are talking about nuclear deterrence. i'm not. >> thank you very much. thank you for the introduction. for those of you who
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2013 11:00pm EST
meetings of your performance that has created so much importance turmoil in russia and in the world. i realize the other day the one piece that you have done that is the most important is a strange and beautiful factor action supported a woman's right to pray. i have been reading about money and male power in how important men are on colin's and paper money sometimes to men but women are rarely on many some of the meaning is a represents the imperial prayer between father and son. that is governing, history, religion , ideology based on men's imperial prayer also uttered more publicly and privately and that power will be passed from father to son and everyone will with is that display and worship of all the powers of the power especially the church. bring you asserted in your letter to the patriarch the sincerity of your prayer i wondered for a moment if you were being ingenuous. but the more it thought about it after reading the court documents, i realize what prayer is and was and female prisoners are kept hidden so there will be no spectacle of female power in the world. all actions
CSPAN
Feb 4, 2013 7:00am EST
. frisk examines russia's involvement in the conservative movement and his relationship with "national review" founder william f. buckley. it's about an hour. >> thank you, john, and good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. there were two bills at "national review." and in the conservative movement. two bills. bill buckley, a brilliant shooting star lit up the sky, and bill rusher, and never wavering north star by which conservatives learned to chart their political course. now, many have written about william f. buckley, jr., that a resistible man, but no one until david frisk has given us an in depth portrait of the other bill, william rusher, who among his other contributions played a pivotal role in the life of the national draft goldwater committee, and that was critical. because if there had been no draft goldwater committee, there would have been no presidential candidate barry goldwater in 1964. and if there had been no candidate goldwater in 1964, there would have been no president-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater you see who approved reagan's famous television addre
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2013 8:15pm EST
the kaiser for instance in germany, the czar in russia who because they are there only through privilege and not confidence are really not very skilled in diplomacy and not very able to repent the outback of world war i. after that assassination you referred to. now iraq. a nonpartisan statement but i think it's said fairly that experienced foreign-policy and tended to listen arguably to people who wanted to precipitate the war. her hep c moved impetuously without appropriate evidence regarding wmd. that can be seen as leadership and later on the intelligence was proven not to have been there. here is the fun part. if you are trying to get these ideas and compare them to "lord of the rings" has its own decrepitude to talk about as well.
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2013 1:00pm EST
, russia to the north. united states can't just pack up and walk away. but are we able to convince the people there, our local hosts and potential allies, that we need to be there? that is the question. and that is where i believe there has been a failure. >> host: but we are -- our footprint is going to be much smaller after 2014. >> guest: that's a choice we're making and i'm not entirely happy. i would like a different kind of footprint. if you had conditionals like the one i went to, which is a university now, and they open -- if you had ten of these, throughout the tribal areas, think of the impact. think of the future generation, in one stroke you're changing the direction of a nation. if we value education, knowledge, law, a compassionate civil society, we must understand, peter so do the irans and pakistanis. we must try to convey this to them. not to suggest that soldiers and guns and missiles and drones because that will immediately have locals resisting. so the paradigm has to be thought out and that can only be thought out if the debate begins. so i'm hoping we'll act a
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2013 7:00am EST
is tenacious as she is to make certain that this is a process at russia as a cynic applies with. our responsibilities, and we want to make it more easy for you to help us accomplish the goals that -- by doing our jobs. and so there s no -- that you, i'm just and is all of us, and it is well past time for this congress to function regard to appropriations process. and 18 seconds i have left, let me ask, i guess i would focus on nih, so perhaps you, mr. werfel. the impact of sequestration on nih. i believe that medical resources significant important, help save lives and reduce the cost of health care. one of the things i think would be significant discretion at nih for how it handles sequestration in the sense that much of the money goes there and is provided in grants elsewhere, the question i want to zero in on is, will that money be used internally for research projects at nih? if there's a reduction in spending will be reduction come in an equal fashion, or how will they be divided between research done at nih or the 80 plus% of the research that's done across the country i univer
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2013 12:15am EST
used to be, like, russia, the bomb, whatever you want to name it, and what they figured out 10 and 20 years from now the greatest threat will simply be an individual or a small group who's determined to die for their cause, right? and you don't have to invoke 9/11 to see what the damage can be. but when you look at assassins, they can be divided into two categories; hunters and howlers. and howlers make a lot of noise, and they call in bomb threats and say they're going to kill us, but the good news is they rarely take action. hunters are very different. hunters plot, plan and execute. but here's what's fascinating is ha hunter -- that hunters have almost no interest in howling, and howlers have almost no interest in hunting. and if you look at the four assassins, all four of them are hunters. and that means the secret service, who i have so much respect for, they took me to their training facility out in maryland, it means that the person that they are looking for is the person who they'll never see coming, right? that's a scary thought. um, and along with asags sins -- assassins, yo
CSPAN
Feb 9, 2013 8:00pm EST
america. to america. it used to be russia or the bomb or another country or china. the greatest threat to american security will simply be an individual or a small group who is determined to die for their cause. you don't have to evoke 9/11 to see what the damage will be or if you look at assassins they could be divided into categories. hunters and howlers. howlers make a lot of noise and they call it on threats and they intend to kill us but the good news is they rarely take action. the hunters are different. hunters clock, plan and execute but here's what fascinating. hunters have almost no interest in howling and howlers have almost no interest in hunting and if you look at the for assassins all four of them are hunters. that means the secret service who i have so much respect for further training facility in maryland it means the person they are looking for is the person who they will never see coming. that is a scary thought. along with assassins the funniest part of it is the guy who took me into this museum the guy who has all the body parts he was in the front row so he is ther
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2013 11:00am EST
information. if you want to compare the worst of the worst, germany, russia and poland, the chance of war or violent deaths are several times slower than most traditional societies that it's not that they're more vicious. it's more intermittent affair because the government declares war and the saudi government declares peace, hotheaded young men who want to start a war or restrained from starting, whereas traditional societies is a government that restrains potheads from going back to work. traditional societies are costly and the numbers show chances of dying a violent death in traditional societies that contains the chance is to mobile society. >> jemma mintier right there. >> we just see in our own country in recent months just to much pure evil if you will. could you imagine any traditional society en masse killing of children? the virtues of the traditional society prevent that. >> not only can i imagine that, sadly it's common. sadly it is common to killings of children and friends of mine said of course we will kill the women and of course will kill the children because the
CSPAN
Feb 24, 2013 1:20pm EST
states, china, it includes russia. russia is really neither an economic or military superpower except in regards to its nuclear arsenal. and then we have friends and britain and here we have two very much medium powers that are not economic heavyweights, you still exert a great deal of forward and influence in world affairs. a large part of that as leverage they security council itself. we have no india, no brazil, no party from outside this kind of frozen group. and this is, i think, an enormous problem for the security council and one that there's probably no structural way to overcome. the reason why is pretty simple. if you say to any of the current members, why did she set on down, france and britain come you guys had to combine in a single european union fee. and then there's a lot of hemming and hauling it in the meantime, germany pops up and says pet, we are actually one of the world's great economic superpowers. we have no military to speak of and we cannot do anything, but we pay for everything, so we actually deserve a seat. she say we know how the military either, which is
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2013 3:00am EST
world with even highly repressive regimes like russia or china or iran but this cannot be explained by crime or crime rates. no. during the same period of time that our incarceration rates increased exponentially, crime rates fluctuate, went up, down, back up again, down again, and today as bad as they are in many parts of the country, nationally the crime rates are at historical lows. but incarceration rates at historic the sword. most criminologists and sociologists today will lead knowledge crime and acceleration rates in the united states have moved independently of one another. incarceration rates especially black incarceration rates have soared regardless whether the crime is going up or down in any given community or the nation as a whole. what explains the sudden explosion in incarcerations? the birth of the system unprecedented in world history sent crime and crime rates well the answer is the war on drugs and the get-tough move meant the way the putative mess that washed over the united states. drug convictions alone accounted for about two-thirds of the increase in the fe
CSPAN
Feb 10, 2013 2:00pm EST
combat operations? i don't see, youp know, russia invading western europe. if there's a war with china, ir don't see it being a ground war, at least not with us involved. president obama and secretary panetta and the joint chiefs of staff in their strategy reviewne oftt a year ago which is the mot attention to that was the pivote from europe to the pacific, one thing in that review that wasn't so well noted was the idea that it's kind of an end of nation building. he said the army and marines shall not size its forces for large-scale, prolonged stability operations which translated to english is like no more iraqs and afghanistans. not just no more iraqs and afghanistans, but when you do your scenarios, when you crank your calculations to figure out how many troops you need, thiss is not even the kind of scenario that should enter into the calculation. and as you say, the small stuff is mainly special forces. some people, including john nogle, have proposed setting up a special advise and assist, you know, soldiers who would be specialists in being advisers to overseas armies. and i th
CSPAN
Feb 10, 2013 4:00pm EST
in russia, training as a backup, and when i was there, i had no idea that i would get a chance tofully to space. i was just given an opportunity to go and train. and a lot of people may have said, well, why should i spend six months in the cold winter of moscow, and just go there for no apparent reason. and to me it was an opportunity to go spend time if with the astronauts and go to the same places the first person who went to space resided, and that whole history of the russian space program compelled me to go there. and being there gave me that opportunity to be at the right place at the right time. unfortunately for the primary crew member, northwestern who was suppose -- the person who was supposed to fliful he developed kidney stone which disqualified him from the flight. but fortunately for me, i was there to say, i'll take his seat! and that what i did. and this is another point i usually -- when i talk to students, which i do quite often, i try to tell them that if you have a passion, if there's something you want to do even if you're very far from it, you have to have
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2013 11:00pm EST
agenda. negotiating the new s.t.a.r.t. treaty with russia was example of traditional diplomacy at its best. been working then working it through the congress was an example of traditional bipartisan support at its best. but we also have been working with partners around the world to create a new institution, the nuclear security summit, to keep dangerous materials out of the hands of terrorists. we conducted intensive diplomacy with major powers to impose crippling sanctions against iran and north korea but to enforce the sanctions we also enlisted banks, insurance companies in high-tech international financial institutions and today iran's oil tankers sit idle and its currency has taken a massive hit. this brings me to a third lever, economics. everyone knows how important it is. but not long ago it was thought that business drove markets and governments drove geopolitics. will, creating jobs at home is now part of the portfolio of diplomatic abroad. there arguing for, not economic rules of the road is based the same asia so we can make trade a race to the top and not a scramble to t
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2013 12:00pm EST
, to russia, to iran and north korea, the united states, the discussion has been rather precise. i'd like to expand the breadth and perhaps the depth of the questions in this discussion to include two organizations that i think play a role in this. one is the shanghai cooperation organization led by china which both india and iran are, observer, observer attendees at the meetings and at their meetings they have come up with policies and responsibilities assigned to the member nations with regard to the future of afghanistan and some other issues. the second is the collective security treaty organization, a military counterpart to nato and russia's lead role in that. i think that if you consider these organizations the question arises, why do we have so much trouble figuring out china's motivations and russia's motivations, what are behind their stratdpigs -- strategies because russia and china respectively could in these two organizations lead from behind. and have other member organizations affect outcomes of such talks as the six-party talks and other negotiations. i'd like to hear
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 8:00am EST
that way your the conservative movement was still jelling. in the 1970s, russia's focus is on, it initially on the possibility of actually replacing the republican party with a new conservative party. i found a letter in which he said to a friend my problem, about 1975, my problem with the republican party isn't that it's not conservative enough. it's that it isn't big enough. again, he wanted to win. and republicans after watergate in the mid '70s were just in terrible shape. i won't recite the details but, you know, a lot of them probably felt they were back where they were back in the 1930s. not only minority part but a small minority part. russia wants to take this opportunity to start a new conservative party. not rigidly conservative but consciously conservative. one in which the liberal wing of the republican party would not be present and, therefore, would not have the veto power he thought they would have. he believed the key to this was one, not necessary the most important thing but an important thing, is to moderate economic conservatism a little bit and be a little mo
CSPAN
Feb 25, 2013 5:00pm EST
diplomatically given russia's strong support military and in other words for the regime. >> andrea, i'll let your first question, and i'll let the secretary answer questions, two, three, and four. [laughter] i will -- why should they come and meet? they should come and meet because in fact, countries have been helping them, and because we are precisely meeting to determine how to help president asad change the calculation on the ground. i said that priestly in the united states that president assad needs to be able to change his calculation. and president obama has been engaged in examining exactly in what ways we may be able to contribute to that. that's the purpose of this meeting in rome. so i would urge the syrian opposition to join us as a matter of practicality and of informing us. but i would say to them ahead of time that in our discussions here today, our discussions in washington, which prompted us to accept this meeting with a new secretary of state at the beginning moment of the second term of president obama, when he himself has expressed concerns about it, that this moment is r
CSPAN
Feb 6, 2013 7:30am EST
immigrants who fled russia come here and that grandson became the majority leader of our house of representatives. [applause] that's what this country is about. [applause] you know, in north carolina, two bicycle shop mechanics gave mankind the gift of light. the wright brothers flew 22 feet at that time. 18 feet in the air. they performed a miracle. as a result, only 66 years later this country put a man on the moon and brought him back. that's who we are. we can do an enormous amount as a people. the wright brother's father, milton, actually inspired his sons by giving them a toy helicopters. he never ever wanted his two sons orville and will burt to fly together for fear he would lose them. seven years after the original flight, so in 1910, milton gave them the permission to fly together. the only time they ever did in the and it lasted six minutes. later that day they took the father up in to the air. it lasted seven minutes. rising 350 feet at that time. while mil ton shouted, higher with orville, higher. i think it's a great testament to what our country is about. because in
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 9:00am EST
. when immigrants but the steps of russia, there is no delta flight for virgin air flight. you bet the last dollars a night to litigate away from the oppression and reestablish her life and mr. lynn. as unit to the harbor, it's a terrific quality of your first look at the new land and its pakistani economy to the fog will clear and see the statue of liberty. you go right by the statue of liberty and it would of the pedestal had been built with pennies and nickels of the ones before them. the at the first look at the new york city skyline, where they learned there and push, get their first foothold on the american academic life and it would be cleaning up the code to the world building. not a monument to commerce, banking, manufacturing or agriculture, but a monument to the american press, the only constitutionally protect it for business in the 90s they doesn't say you have the right to make steel. the new york world will be the ticket to understanding how to get ahead. the ticket to understanding english and american politics. he was a very difficult man to live for as a biographer. h
CSPAN
Feb 12, 2013 8:00pm EST
, we'll engage russia to seek further reductions in our nuclear arsenal and continue leading the global effort to secure nuclear materials that could fall into the wrong hands, because our ability to influence others depends on our willingness to lead and meet our obligations. america must also face the rapidly growing threat from cyberattacks. applause president obama: now, we know hackers steal people's identity and infiltrate private e-mails. we know foreign countries and companies swipe our corporate secrets. now our enemies are seeking the ability to sabotage our power grid 0, financial institutions, our air traffic control system. we cannot look back years from now and wonder why we did nothing in the face of real threats to our security and our economy. that's why earlier today i signed a new executive order that will strengthen our cyberdefenses by increasing information sharing and developing standards to protect our national security, our jobs and our privacy. [applause] president obama... but now congress must act as well by passing legislation to give our government a greate
CSPAN
Feb 13, 2013 12:00pm EST
secretary of state, ambassador to israel and russia; frank women of sner, former under secretary of defense for policy and ambassador to egypt and to india. mr. president, senator hagel's nomination has been supported by the major groups of american veterans, including the veterans of foreign wars, the iraq and afghanistan veterans of america, amvets, vietnam veterans of america, and the american legion. he has received support from military officers association of america, foreign area officers association, and the noncommissioned officers acomes ssociation. -- association. senator hagel has been endorsed by numerous newspapers, including "usa today" situated that many -- which stated that many of the supposed weaknesses that republican senators hammered him on are actually proof that hagel takes thoughtful positions, doesn't bend easily to pressure. i'd like to read just a few quotes from those organizations of veterans. veterans -- that have endorsed him. veterans of foreign wars says the following: "it is not the place for america's oldest and largest combat veterans organizatio
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2013 11:00pm EST
right now. i don't see russia invading western europe. if there's a war with china, i don't see it being a groundwork, at least not with those involved. secretary panetta and the joint chiefs of staff a year ago, the most attention and one thing in that review that wasn't so well noted was the idea dictates an end of nationbuilding. the army and marines shall not size his forces for large-scale prolonged stability operations, which translated to english as no more iraq's and afghanistan. not just no more, but when you do your scenarios, when you crank your calculations to figure out how many troops you need, this is not even the scenario that should enter into the calculation. as you say, the small stuff is mainly special forces. some people, as you write have proposed setting up a special advise and assist. soldiers who would be specialists in the advisors to overseas armies. that is what a lot of the army is doing. but they are kind of in a pickle. they don't know what to do. there's something western california in the desert of the national training center. during the cold war.
CSPAN
Feb 7, 2013 12:00pm EST
russia have warmed between 3.5 degrees and 5.5 degrees farenheit in the last century, leading to the loss of permafrost. russians, like alaskans, who i spoke about before, build homes and roads and infrastructure on the permafrost. when it disappears, communities lose the very foundations on which they are built. noaa says the russian heat wave of 2010, which killed tens of thousands of people, was the most severe since records were first kept back in 1880. and this type of heat wave is now more and more likely. go to the land down under where warmer and more acidic oceans have fueled a widespread coral bleaching in the great barrier reef. the great barrier reef is a natural wonder. it is one of the great wonders of the world. and economically, it's the basis of a $4 billion tourism industry in australia. and it is dying before our eyes. scientists say that climate change heightens the devastation from other natural disasters in australia, like the 2009 bush fires that claimed 173 lives, the 2011 flooding that killed dozens, and the wildfires that have already damaged hundreds of
CSPAN
Feb 27, 2013 11:00pm EST
leaks. it's time for them to a something substantial to say on the subject. >> add-on of russia back to my colleagues other than the most interesting omission is the lack of any detail in a procedural process. if their streets and side effects and intelligence led us to discover this hack should be kept classified, that's one thing. i am by the bureaucratic process was undertaken at the executive branch in the hypothetical case is a matter of national security. >> you can imagine the problem is we argue about everything. the idea we would put some kind of process forward. i fully understand your point and as a lawyer i think it's necessary. the idea that process will be put forward to be analyzed in a vacuum but that the exigency of circumstances, some in there would be a debate -- i understand your wanting, but under the present climate it's just almost impossible. >> i did there's a lot of merit to that point and i also think there's additional factor not about this body, but the litigation environment the is in. one of the problem within the bureaucracy, people are constantly
CSPAN
Feb 13, 2013 9:00am EST
russia in unison through reciprocal presidential directives, negotiated in another round of bilateral arms reduction talks, or implemented unilaterally. it goes on, this unusual statement quote, security is mainly a state of mind, not a physical condition, and mutual assured destruction no longer occupies a central psychological or political space in the u.s., russian relationship. i don't think that's true where russia is. further on, that was on page one of the report. then it says this about bilateral and nuclear arms negotiations on page 16. >> would you forgive the interruption? i think i'm able to set a time for a vote now if we can get some idea about how long you want to speak him and i'm not trying to limit you. can you give us an idea about how long? i just talked to senator blumenthal and i want to ask senator hirono the same question. >> i just want to share a few thoughts spent know, is five minutes enough? >> seven. >> that's no problem. senatosenator hirono, how long t you speak? senator blumenthal? i'm now going to schedule a vote for 5:00. you about at five. we will h
CSPAN
Feb 4, 2013 8:30am EST
border to russia, we have the team of soldiers sleeping in the same rooms as their male colleagues all year round. in my battalion in norway, i didn't want this, and we separated, and the reason for this is that when deployed, there is a no alcohol, we don't have all these issues going out, but the combination with alcohol, young women and men together, that's not always easy. when they came home from, i think, the few harassment issues we've had, they were always combinedded with alcohol, and, therefore, i was a little concerned to have them sleeping in the same room, not about ability to lock their doors and so on. it's sad to tell, but that's the truth. >> do you have something to say? >> i did. the critical mass thing put me on alert since i've been listening to that. particularly, after i saw the article in "usa today" yesterday talking about general amos talking about what he thinks it means. i don't think they know what they mean by the term "critical mass" and having been on staff duty a lot and seeing the compromises that have had to be made to come to accord. i'm thinking tha
CSPAN
Feb 26, 2013 12:00pm EST
the military side. as we know, russia and iran have provided help. that's wrong. that's only adding to the problems and giving strength to a person who has turned on his own people. but then we need to coordinate our attentions so that we can provide the help they need and the confidence they're looking to so that they will have the necessary training not only to reclaim their country but then to rule their country in a democratic way that respects the rights of all the citizens. as the chair of the helsinki commission i pointed that out to the syrian opposition, that we want to provide the help so that they can rule their country one day. we hope sooner rather than later. in a way that respects the rights of all of its citizens, provides economic opportunity foreits -- for its citizens. that's the only you'll have a nation that respects the security of its country. that was the message we delivered and i hope that the united states will join other countries in a more concerted effort to get assad out of syria. as i said, i think he should be at the hague and held accountable for hi
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 10:00am EST
united states and russia are full of many, many nuclear weapons many, many, many times bigger than this. but this is a rough and ready nuke of the kind that it would not be hard for the iranians or the north koreans or pakistanis or others to design. and so what would happen if one of these things was popped off in downtown manhattan? well, the map shows certain assumptions about wind speed and other factors what the devastation would be, and, of course, it's worst around the ground zero, and it's slowly getting a little bit better as you go farther out. but the estimate in this scientific journal is that this relatively small nuclear device would jury about 1.6 million people and kill over 600 million people just from being -- 600,000 people. i think we need to think about these kinds of dangers because they are not going away, and as the iranian nuclear program accelerates, these are very real possibilities that we have to think very hard about. rome was brought down by barbarians. we have to be very careful that we ourselves are not brought down by barbarians. and i think the fi
CSPAN
Feb 9, 2013 8:45pm EST
combat operations? i don't see russia invading western europe i don't see it being a ground war war, president obama and panetta that the most attention was the pivot one thing that wasn't so well noted was the idea of nation-building that they show the size its forces for long scale operations which means no more iraq and afghanistan. when you do your scenarios and calculations the small stuff is the special forces. is setting up a special specialist and that is what the army is doing now. there is something in western california called the national training center with massive tank battles in iraq and afghanistan have direct did mock villages and they have exiles, somebody would be an insurgent and they play these useful and creative games but now it is called full spectrum operation at the national training center for the first time they fired artillery shells but also a humanitarian assistance and sings with the village so they train for everything and also the best way to cut money cheaply and quickly is by cutting manpower it would take five years to build the aircraft carrier
CSPAN
Feb 1, 2013 5:00pm EST
and looking at international adoptions and why russia won't allow americans to adopt anymore. plus, your e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. on tuesday, the american enterprise institute hosted a panel of scholars to preview president obama's upcoming state of the union address and how foreign policy and national security will be addressed in the president's second term. this is one hour and 20 minutes. >> good afternoon, folks. [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon, folks. can i please get everybody to sit down and speak quietly? i think we are going to start here. good afternoon, everybody. i am danielle pletka. i am from the american enterprise institute. welcome to our first an annual series of state of the union policy event. every year, aei scholars come together and answer questions that have been raised or are likely to come up. we try to look forward a little bit and think about what the right answers are to the questions that are being posed. it is one of the few events that we do with only aei scholars, alt
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 12:00pm EST
and this is what people forget. when immigrants left the steppes of russia there with note delta flight, virgin air flight to see mom the next year. you were betting your last dollar that you might be able to get away from the oppressive left and reestablish your life in his new land. as you enter the harbor terrific moment, you had your first look at the new land and the fog is there, maybe the fog will clear and you will see the statue of liberty and those immigrants would see that, go by the statue of liberty and they would not know the pedestal being built with pennies and nickels, then they would turn and have the first look at the new york city skyline, the city that would welcome them, where they learn their english, where they get their first foothold on the american economic life and if the sun was right you be leaning off of the gold dome of the world building, not a monument to congress or banking or manufacturing or agriculture but a monument to the american press, the only constitutionally explicitly constitutionally protected business in the united states by the fir
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2013 4:30pm EST
states and russia are full of many weapons many times bigger than this. but this is a very rough and ready with a time that wouldn't be hard for the iranians or the north koreans are pakistanis or others to design so what would happen if one of these was popped off in downtown manhattan? the map shows with certain assumptions about other factors with the devastation would be and of course it's worse around ground zero and it's getting a little bit better as you go further out but the estimate in the scientific journal is that this relatively small nuclear device would injure about 1.6 million people and kill over 600,000 people just from being set off in lower manhattan and of course you would see similar devastation if one were to be set out in washington. i don't mean to alarm anybody here but i think we need to think about these kind of dangerous because they are not going away and knows the program accelerates and as pakistan destabilizes, these are possibilities we have to think very hard about. roma was brought down by barbarians. we have to be careful that we ourselves are not
CSPAN
Feb 10, 2013 3:15pm EST
the biggest threat to america? used to be russia or the bomb or china or whatever, and they figured out, ten and 20 years from now, the greatest threat to american security will be an individual or small group that is determined to die for their cause, and you don't have to invoke 9/11 to see what the damage can be. when you look at assassins they kinded into hunters and howlers, and howlers make a lot of noise and call in bomb threats and say they're going to kill us, but they rarely take action. the hunters are very different. hunters plot and plan and execute. but here's what is fascinating. hunters have almost no interest in howling, howlers have almost no interest in hunting, if you look at the four assassins, all for of them are hunters and that mean the seek vet service would who i have so much respect for, took me to their train facility in maryland. means the person they're looking for is the person who they'll never see coming. right? that's a scary thought. and along with assassins -- the funniest part of -- always the funniest part of the assist sin is the guy who took m
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 7:00pm EST
worst of the worst, germany, russia, and poland during 20th century. the chances of dying of war or violent death in any of those countries during the 20th century are several times lower than the chances of dying of violent death in most traditional societies, and the reason is that the people in traditional societies are more vicious but that war is an intimate affair in modern societies with governments because the governments declare war and eventually declares peace. when the government declares peace hot headed young men who want to start a war again are restrained from starting a war, whereas in traditional societies without a centralized government there is of a government that restrains the hot heads from going back to work. so the reality is the traditional societies among war almost constantly. modern societies only intermittently, and the numbers show that the chances of dying of violent death and traditional society is something like ten times the chance to attend best deterrent the chance. that has been a big surprise. >> another question. yes, the gentleman to your ri
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 11:00am EST
a chapter on afghanistan and on china, i talk about russia. india. i talk about america's competitive position in the world, where we are, what the challenges are for us, but also the world. i talk about alliances. i talk about the need to reconnect with public service. i have always believed that there is no nobler profession than public service. we havety myished that -- diminished that over a generation in a sense how many politicians have you heard make fun of government employees or diminish many some way -- in some way or make offhanded comments about washington is the bane of our existence, nothing good happens in washington. only the good, smart people are in nebraska or california or ohio. [laughter] you say that for political advantage occasionally, but unfortunately, that has permeated a society of young people who have been conditioned in many ways. and i think of what we are going to need and what joseph nye first wrote about from harvard in 1990. and he was, joseph nye was before our foreign relations committee along with richard armitage, and they were co-ch
CSPAN
Feb 26, 2013 6:00am EST
with a decision made by russia to impose a ban as a result of the use here of rack taupe mean that is not scientifically based and is contrary to international law. our office has stated very clearly it's our expectation that russia will reverse that decision. that's another risk to the livestock industry that's manmade. now, fortunately, we got some good news yesterday as the scientific commission from oie has now indicated that the u.s. can now be considered a negligence jill risk nation for bse, and hopefully that will be confirmed this summer. and we further got good news with additional opening of markets, particularly for our beef. last month we talked about the opportunity that japan is now affording for a wider market in japan which is good news, and we've had the korean free trade agreement and the opportunities that presents. we've also seen mexico relax some of its restrictions on beef purchases and today hong kong will join that list by indicating a willingness to take all deboned beef products of any age and boned-in beef less than 30 months. so an expanding opportunity w
CSPAN
Feb 21, 2013 11:00pm EST
barriers also exists, created by other nations. right now we are dealing with a decision made by russia to impose a ban of october mean, that is not scientific, ended his contract to -- contradictory to the law. it is stated very clearly that our expectation that russia will reverse that decision. fortunately we got some good news yesterday, and the scientific commission has now indicated that the u.s. cannot be considered a risk nations for bse, hopefully that will be confirmed this summer. with additional opening of markets. particularly, for our crops. last month, we talked about the opportunity that japan is a 40 for a wider market, which is good news. we have the free trade agreement and the opportunity that that presents. we have also seen mexico relaxed some of its restrictions on beef purchases, and today, hong kong was joining that list by indicating the willingness to take all of its own beef products of any age, less than 30 months. an expanded opportunity we're where the trade barriers are coming down. the beef barriers exist. it is important to have the resource and personnel
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 7:30pm EST
harbor, this is something that people forget. when immigrants left steps of russia, there was no virgin air flight to go home and see her mother. you are betting your last dollar to you could reestablish your life in this new land. as you enter the harbor, it is a tragic moment. you're going to have your first look at the new land. maybe the fog will clear and you will see the statue of liberty. the immigrants wouldn't exactly know the bit the pedestal was built by the tenets and lower class people, but then they would take a look at the new york city skyline. the city where they would learn english and get a foothold on american economic life. and if this run was right, it would glean off the dome of the world holding. not a monument to banking or manufacturing or other professions, but an individual who understood the new york world and the ticket to understanding how to get ahead and learning english. the ticket to american politics are you that is the effect that joseph pulitzer had. he was a very difficult man to live with. he was sort of like the howard hughes of the 19th century.
CSPAN
Feb 1, 2013 12:00pm EST
divide for inaction. because putin is doing his work for him. as long as he knows that russia and china will not come aboard, and as long as either stays within the system, stasis is the politician. it's a way of rigging things. if we believe, if we come to the determination under either the president or us here or anyone who cares about this. if you come to the determination that the objective, the three objectives i listed before are worthy and necessary objectives so you have justified ends and you discover that the u.n. is precisely the antithesis of any meaningful means to accomplish this. it's clear to me staying within the united nations framework is a formula for doing nothing. putin has been given a veto over the foreign policy and given it gladly. it unburdens the administration of the challenge of having to face the problem directly. it's been going on for 11 points. -- twenty two months. it putin is not going to relet. we know about him. he believes in the heavy foot prints not the light. my view is it was long time to go outside the u.n. and the united states should f
CSPAN
Feb 11, 2013 12:00pm EST
to bring our troops home, period. you don't see china, russia going all over the world, you know, being the world's policemen. it's time we stop. >> host: okay, and we increase spending that way? >> caller: yes. it's time we embraced sanity instead of insanity. >> host: all right. june in norfolk, virginia, a republican caller. hi, june. >> caller: hi. we've got to get rid of these taxes. this is just too much. we gave in already once. we've give in several times -- we've given in several times. we've got to stop the spending. it's, we are, you know, we've got, we've got socialistic governments all over the world. if that's what you want, please, get on a plane and go there and live. >> host: so, june -- >> caller: we have got to get our country under control. >> host: so, june, do you think republicans should hold that line and let sequestration happen if they, if democrats will not agree to spending cuts? >> caller: well, they're not going to agree to spending cuts. they have all of the press, and it is spun every day. we hear nothing on the media about the fact that we are tax
CSPAN
Feb 13, 2013 11:00pm EST
world. russia and china, almost the whole world has condemned what they have done. as a result of that, it should be a great concern to the international community that they are continuing to develop their capabilities to threaten security. not only of south korea, but to the rest of the world. for that reason, i think that we must take steps to make very clear to them that that kind of behavior is unacceptable. >> are there any sort of steps you are contemplating taking? >> i think it is a combination of a number of things that we have to do. one is the diplomatic steps that have to be taken. bringing the security conflict together to condemn their actions is very important. to organize the international community to do that. this morning i talked with the defense minister of south korea and we both agreed that we must make sure that we made clear that we are going to continue to conduct exercises and deploy our forces in that area. we are going to continue to show the north koreans that we are fully prepared to deal with any contingencies. we are going to work with both south ko
CSPAN
Feb 5, 2013 8:00pm EST
america, the grandson of poor immigrants, who fled russia, come here, and that grandson became the majority leader of the house of representatives. that's what this country is about. [applause] in kitty hawk, north carolina. two bicycle shop mechanic gave mappedkind the gift of flight. the wright brothers flew only 22 feet at that time. 18 feet in the air. but they performed a miracle. as a result, only 66 years later, this country put a man on the moon and brought him back. that's who we are. we can do an enormous amount as a people. the wright brothers' father milton inspired his sons by giving them a toy helicopter. he never, ever wanted his two sons, orville and wilbur to fly together for fear that he would lose them. and seven years after the original flight, in 1910, milton gave them permission to fly together. the only time they if did. and it lasted six minutes. now, later that day, orville took his 82-year-old father up into the air. it lasted seven minutes. rising 350 feet at that time. while milton shouted, higher, orville, higher. i think it's a great testament to what
CSPAN
Feb 15, 2013 9:00am EST
and the rest of the world. russia, china, almost the whole world, and as a result of that, it should be a great concern to the international community that they are continuing to develop their capabilities when not only to south korea but to the rest of the world coming and for that reason i think that we have to take steps. >> can you describe in any way the factions or steps as you put it that you are contemplating taking? >> it is a combination of a number of things. one is the diplomatic steps that have to be taken. i think the security council, bringing the security council together is important to organize the international community to do that. i believe that this morning i talked with the defense minister of south korea and we both agreed that we ought to make sure that we make clear we are going to continue to conduct exercises and continue to deploy the force is in that area. .. what can you tell us now that we don't know about the operations? who -- you know, the one thing that maybe you -- >> it wasn't james gandolfini who did that, i just want you to -- >> you kno
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